Breeds

German Shorthaired Pointer

The German Shorthaired Pointer is the most popular HPR gundog breed in both Europe and the UK. It truly is a fast paced all-purpose rough shooting dog. It is a handsome and streamlined yet powerful dog, with strong hindquarters that make it able to move rapidly and turn quickly. They are a very affectionate breed, and make excellent family pets, provided that enough company, stimulation and free running exercise can be obtained. They are completely adaptable and easily trainable, with a desire to please, and in addition to HPR work, can easily turn their hand (paw) to everything from Agility and Canicross to working under birds of prey and Deer Stalking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_shorthaired_pointer

German Wirehaired Pointer

The German Wirehaired Pointer is a well-muscled, medium sized dog of distinctive appearance. Balanced in size and sturdily built, the breed’s most distinguishing characteristics are its weather resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings. Typically Pointer in character and style, the German Wire-haired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter which also makes an excellent pet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Wirehaired_Pointer

German Longhaired Pointer

The German Longhaired Pointer is a muscular, elegant, and athletic breed which runs with great speed and freedom of movement. It is very trainable and loves to work, needs large amounts of exercise daily and is not well suited to urban life. GLPs need a moderate amount of grooming about once or twice a week. They are highly intelligent, affectionate and make excellent pets. For a minor breed here in the UK they have also proven themselves excellent trialling dogs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Longhaired_Pointer

Weimaraner

The Weimaraner was originally bred for hunting in the early 19th century, when they were used by royalty for hunting large game such as boar, bears, deer, and wolves. The Weimaraner is a true all-purpose gun dog, it does not hunt with the pace of a GSP but is thorough, an excellent retriever and loves water. It is loyal and loving to its family and a fearless guardian of its family and territory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weimaraner

Large Munsterlander

The Large Munsterlander is athletic, intelligent, noble, and elegant in appearance. It has a fluid and elastic gait and hunts with pace and style. The Munster was predominantly developed for working and has proven itself here in the UK. It is a very sensitive and affectionate dog and shares many traits with its GLP relative.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Munsterlander

Brittany

The Brittany was originally developed in the Brittany province of France in the 1800’s for the purpose of bird hunting. A Brittany is typically quite athletic and solidly built without being heavy and is one of the most compact of the HPR breeds. They are sweet natured dogs, are easy to train and their expressions are usually of intelligence, vigour, and alertness. Their gait is elastic, long, and free and they are hard hunting dogs which cover a surprising amount of ground. This breed is more sensitive to correction than most other HPR breeds and they need at least an hour of vigorous exercise per day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brittany_dog

Italian Spinone

The Italian Spinone is an extremely versatile gun dog. It is a loyal, friendly, easy going and patient breed, with a somewhat docile character. The breed is not known for any aggression and is therefore not a wise choice for somebody looking for a guard dog.

The Spin is an ancient working breed and this has created an intelligent dog that is easily trained, although some can be stubborn about performing a learned task if they see no point in it. Because they are sensitive, motivational training works best for this breed, as this gentle creature’s feelings can easily be hurt when handled incorrectly.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Spinone

Bracco Italiano

The Bracco Italiano – or Italian Pointer, should be athletic and powerful in appearance, most resembling a cross between a German Shorthaired Pointer and a Bloodhound, although it is nothing like them in character. Bracco’s are very much a people-loving dog and thrive on human companionship. They are very willing to please as long as they have decided that your idea is better than theirs. Obedience training is a must for a Bracco, and the more is asked of them, the better they do. Although not an aggressive breed, Bracco’s will bark or growl if there’s a good reason.

They are an active breed, but require mental stimulation more than physical exercise to keep them happy- but regular free running will actually achieve both.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracco_Italiano

Hungarian Vizsla

The Hungarian Vizsla is a natural hunter endowed with an excellent nose and an outstanding trainability. Although they are lively, gentle mannered, demonstrably affectionate and sensitive, they are also fearless and possessed of a well-developed protective instinct.

Smaller in stature than most HPR’s, their size is one of the breed’s most appealing features. HV’s have an excellent ability to take training, however they must be trained gently and without harsh commands or strong physical correction, as they have sensitive temperaments and can be easily damaged if trained too harshly. Many handlers claim that you negotiate with a Vizsla rather than command it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Vizsla

Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla

The Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla is a versatile, natural hunter endowed with an excellent nose and an above average trainability. They are excellent retrievers and have the determination to remain on the scent even when swimming. They have a lean build and are very robust. The Wirehaired Vizsla thrives on attention, exercise, and interaction. It is highly intelligent, and enjoys being challenged and stimulated, both mentally and physically. However, they must be trained gently and without harsh commands or strong physical correction, as they have sensitive temperaments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Wirehaired_Vizsla

Korthals Griffon

The Korthals Griffon or Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is Dutch in ancestry, but is regarded as a German breed as this is where it was developed. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is particularly adapted for swampy country, where its harsh wiry coat and thick undercoat provides excellent protection. The  Griff is a superb swimmer and retriever and it loves to play in the water. They are known as intelligent, extremely eager to please, friendly dogs. They are also known for their slightly less excitable temperament when not in the field, which makes them a very comfortable dog when at home. Most Griffons do not take well to living their lives in kennels. They are extremely people oriented and prefer to be somewhere in the vicinity of their owners.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korthals_Griffon

Slovakian Rough-haired Pointer

The Slovakian Rough-haired Pointer was established by crossing German Wirehaired Pointers, Weimaraners, and the Cesky Fousek (also known as the Bohemian Wirehaired Pointing Griffon). The SRHP breed has had slight input from the Pudelpointer as well. The breed was developed to produce a dog with great stamina which would track, point, retrieve in water or land, and be suitable for a range of prey from birds, hares and other small animals, and large game up to the size of deer.

Smaller and lighter built than a GWP. The SRHP is a kind natured and extremely biddable dog that is an excellent multi-purpose gun dog but also makes an extremely affectionate family pet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovakian_Rough-haired_Pointer

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